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End-Permian mass extinction and palaeoenvironmental changes in Neotethys: Evidence from an oceanic carbonate section in southwestern Tibet
Shen, Shu-zhong (沈树忠)1; Cao, Chang-qun (曹长群)1; Zhang, Yi-chun (张以春)1; Li, Wen-zhong1; Shi, G. R.2; Wang, Yue (王玥)1; Wu, Ya-sheng3; Ueno, K.4; Henderson, C. M.5; Wang, Xiang-dong (王向东)1; Zhang, Hua (张华)1; Wang, Xiao-juan (王小娟)1; Chen, Jun (陈军)1
2010-08-01
Source PublicationGLOBAL AND PLANETARY CHANGE
ISSN0921-8181
Volume73Issue:1-2Pages:3-14
Abstract

This paper documents a new Permian-Triassic carbonate sequence which recorded the end-Permian mass extinction in the isolated oceanic setting of Neotethys in southwestern Tibet, China. The sequence is over 350 m thick and consists of the Gyanyima and the Lower Lanchengquxia formations in. ascending order. The Lopingian (Late Permian) Gyanyima Formation is composed of fossiliferous reddish carbonates dominated by Colaniella grainstone and reef facies including fenestrate/sponge/coral framestone and bafflestone. 156 species are recognized from the Lopingian Gyanyima Formation. Composite ranges of brachiopods, ostracods, rugose corals and foraminifers at the Gyanyima Section suggest that evolution and diversification of Permian marine organisms continued to the end-Permian preceding a major faunal extinction close to the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB), coincident with a 2-3 parts per thousand negative shift of delta C-13(carb). The timing and accelerating extinction pattern and the negative delta C-13(carb) excursion are largely comparable with those reported from many previously-documented sections on continental shelf environments. Based on a detailed lithofacies analysis, the latest Permian reefal facies is sharply replaced by ostracod/crinoid packstone/grainstone with abrupt abundant occurrences of Early Triassic conodonts at the Gyanyima Section. This is then followed by thrombolitic microbialite, stromatolite, packstone containing abundant spherical microbes, and bivalve/ammonoid packstone of tidal and intertidal facies. This distinct lithofacies and biofacies shift would, therefore, suggest a dramatic faunal community and environmental change across the PTB. Distinct palaeoclimate fluctuations through the P-T interval are also indicated by the alternation of warm- and cool-water faunas through the upperraost part of the succession. The lower part of the Gyanyima Formation is characterized by a warm condition as indicated by Cathaysian-dominated fossils. This was then followed by a mild cooling event as suggested by the occurrence of many distinct peri-Gondwanan elements and absence of compound corals. The latest Changhsingian is characterized exclusively by warm-water faunal elements of Cathaysian affinities, together with the negative shift of delta C-13(carb), suggesting a rapid warming event at the very end of Permian in association with much more widespread volcanic activities than we thought before. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KeywordPermian-triassic Oceanic Carbonate Neotethys End-permian Mass Extinction Gyanyima
DOI10.1016/j.gloplacha.2010.03.007
Language英语
WOS KeywordSelong Xishan Section ; Triassic Boundary Beds ; Southern Tibet ; Xizang Tibet ; Brachiopod Fauna ; China ; Isotope ; Stratigraphy ; Event ; Recovery
Funding ProjectCAS[KZCX2-YW-Q08-4] ; Creative Research Teams, MST[2006FY120300] ; National Basic Research program[2006CB806400] ; NSFC ; Australian Research Council (ARC)[DP0772161] ; NSERC
WOS Research AreaPhysical Geography ; Geology
WOS SubjectGeography, Physical ; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
WOS IDWOS:000283814900002
Funding OrganizationCAS ; Creative Research Teams, MST ; National Basic Research program ; NSFC ; Australian Research Council (ARC) ; NSERC
PublisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Citation statistics
Cited Times:30[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.nigpas.ac.cn/handle/332004/353
Collection中国科学院南京地质古生物研究所
其他
Corresponding AuthorShen, Shu-zhong (沈树忠)
Affiliation1.Nanjing Inst Geol & Palaeontol, State Key Lab Palaeobiol & Stratig, Nanjing 210008, Peoples R China
2.Deakin Univ, Sch Life & Environm Sci, Burwood, Vic 3125, Australia
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China
4.Fukuoka Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Earth Syst Sci, Fukuoka 8140180, Japan
5.Univ Calgary, Dept Geosci, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
First Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Corresponding Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Shen, Shu-zhong ,Cao, Chang-qun ,Zhang, Yi-chun ,et al. End-Permian mass extinction and palaeoenvironmental changes in Neotethys: Evidence from an oceanic carbonate section in southwestern Tibet[J]. GLOBAL AND PLANETARY CHANGE,2010,73(1-2):3-14.
APA Shen, Shu-zhong .,Cao, Chang-qun .,Zhang, Yi-chun .,Li, Wen-zhong.,Shi, G. R..,...&Chen, Jun .(2010).End-Permian mass extinction and palaeoenvironmental changes in Neotethys: Evidence from an oceanic carbonate section in southwestern Tibet.GLOBAL AND PLANETARY CHANGE,73(1-2),3-14.
MLA Shen, Shu-zhong ,et al."End-Permian mass extinction and palaeoenvironmental changes in Neotethys: Evidence from an oceanic carbonate section in southwestern Tibet".GLOBAL AND PLANETARY CHANGE 73.1-2(2010):3-14.
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