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Climate change and anthropogenic activities in Qinghai Lake basin over the last 8500 years derived from pollen and charcoal records in an aeolian section
Wei, Haicheng1,2,3; Ma, Chongyi4; Zhang, Jing4; Sun, Yongjuan1,2,4; Li, Qingkuan1,2; Hou, Guangliang4; Duan, Ronglei4
2020-10-01
Source PublicationCATENA
ISSN0341-8162
Volume193Pages:13
Abstract

The Qinghai Lake basin (QLB) is an ideal region to explore the interaction between climate change, vegetation evolution, and anthropogenic activities during the Holocene epoch. This is due to the basin's particular sensitivity to global climate changes along with its densely distributed archeological sites, present since the last deglaciation. To date, a full understanding of the lakeshore terrestrial fossil pollen record is lacking and few studies have explored the human signals in the pollen spectra of the northeast Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Here, we present fossil pollen and charcoal records from over 8500 years ago obtained from a high resolution-dated aeolian section in the southeastern margin of the QLB. These results show that the pollen spectra are dominated by herbaceous and shrubby pollen taxa, while arboreal pollen taxa are rare. From approximately 8.5-7.2 ka, Artemisia- and Poaceae- dominated temperate steppe developed in the region, suggesting relatively warm and dry climatic conditions. Comparatively, regional vegetation shifted to Cyperaceae-dominated alpine meadow from approximately 7.2-3.4 ka, which reflected cooler and wetter climatic conditions. Thereafter, the amount of Asteraceae, Artemisia, and Chenopodiaceae notably increased from approximately 3.4-1.8 ka, suggesting that temperate steppe dominated the region under relative drier climate. Noticeably, an interval between approximately 1.8-0.6 ka was characterized by an increase of Hippophae pollen, reflecting a comparatively warmer episode; alpine meadow then reoccupied the region since approximately 0.6 ka. Combining the variations of charcoal concentrations (20-50 mu m and > 50 mu m) with human-related pollen taxa (Aster-type, Chenopodiaceae, Plantago, and Hordeum-type), we inferred that prehistoric humans were extensively using fire for hunting and subsistence during 7.2-3.5 ka, which strongly impacted the local vegetation during the middle Holocene; regional grazing activities intensified and caused grassland degradation since approximately 3.5 ka, which manifested with a significant increase in Aster-type and Chenopodiaceae pollen. After this period, Hordeum-type pollen as well as charcoal concentration of > 50 mu m increased significantly since approximately 2.2 ka, suggesting an intensifying agricultural cultivation in the region.

KeywordQinghai Lake Pollen Charcoal Prehistoric human activities Holocene Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau
DOI10.1016/j.catena.2020.104616
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS KeywordNORTHEASTERN TIBETAN PLATEAU ; NORTH-CENTRAL CHINA ; HOLOCENE VEGETATION ; SURFACE POLLEN ; DAIHAI LAKE ; SOURCE AREA ; ENVIRONMENTAL-CHANGES ; OSTRACOD ASSEMBLAGES ; LEVEL VARIATIONS ; CARBON ISOTOPES
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[41877455] ; Science and Technology Department of Qinghai Province Natural Science Fund Project[2017-ZJ-931Q] ; Science and Technology Department of Qinghai Province Natural Science Fund Project[2017-ZJ-901] ; Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Paleobiology and Stratigraphy (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS)[183123] ; Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program (STEP)[2019QZKK0805]
WOS Research AreaGeology ; Agriculture ; Water Resources
WOS SubjectGeosciences, Multidisciplinary ; Soil Science ; Water Resources
WOS IDWOS:000538770800013
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China ; Science and Technology Department of Qinghai Province Natural Science Fund Project ; Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Paleobiology and Stratigraphy (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS) ; Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program (STEP)
PublisherELSEVIER
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.nigpas.ac.cn/handle/332004/32018
Collection中国科学院南京地质古生物研究所
Corresponding AuthorWei, Haicheng; Ma, Chongyi
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Qinghai Inst Salt Lakes, Key Lab Comprehens & Highly Efficient Utilizat Sa, Xining 810008, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Qinghai Inst Salt Lakes, Qinghai Prov Key Lab Geol & Environm Salt Lakes, Xining 810008, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Nanjing Inst Geol & Palaeontol, State Key Lab Palaeobiol & Stratig, Nanjing 210008, Peoples R China
4.Qinghai Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Qinghai Prov Key Lab Phys Geog & Environm Proc, Xining 810008, Peoples R China
First Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Corresponding Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Wei, Haicheng,Ma, Chongyi,Zhang, Jing,et al. Climate change and anthropogenic activities in Qinghai Lake basin over the last 8500 years derived from pollen and charcoal records in an aeolian section[J]. CATENA,2020,193:13.
APA Wei, Haicheng.,Ma, Chongyi.,Zhang, Jing.,Sun, Yongjuan.,Li, Qingkuan.,...&Duan, Ronglei.(2020).Climate change and anthropogenic activities in Qinghai Lake basin over the last 8500 years derived from pollen and charcoal records in an aeolian section.CATENA,193,13.
MLA Wei, Haicheng,et al."Climate change and anthropogenic activities in Qinghai Lake basin over the last 8500 years derived from pollen and charcoal records in an aeolian section".CATENA 193(2020):13.
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