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Using coprophilous fungi to reconstruct the history of pastoralism in the Qinghai Lake Basin, Northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau
Wei, Hai-cheng1,2,3; Hou, Guang-liang4; Fan, Qi-shun1,2; Madsen, David B.5; Qin, Zhan-jie1,2; Du, Yong-sheng1,2; Sun, Yong-juan1,2; Gao, Jing-yi4; Shan, Fa-shou1,2
2020
Source PublicationPROGRESS IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY-EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT
ISSN0309-1333
Volume44Issue:1Pages:70-93
Abstract

The history of permanent human settlement in the high-altitude regions (>3000 m above sea level [masl]) of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) is important in understanding human adaptation to this cold "Third Pole" region. The Qinghai Lake Basin was an important corridor used by prehistoric humans migrating to the inner QTP. Pastoralism is currently the most important means of sustaining permanent human settlement in the high-altitude regions of the QTP. However, the lack of reliable proxy measures reflecting prehistoric pastoral activities impedes our understanding of how pastoralism developed. The identification of coprophilous fungi in prehistoric cultural deposits may help refine the history of pastoralism. We collected 21 modern domesticated herbivore dung samples and 66 surface soil samples from the Qinghai Lake Basin for fungal spore analyses. We then evaluated how useful such analyses are for identifying grazing activities. Fifty-three samples were also collected from the JXG2 stratigraphic profile (similar to 10.0-0 ka; 3312 masl) for fungal spore analysis. Results indicate that low and stable values of the total concentration of coprophilous fungi were present from similar to 10.0 to similar to 5.5 ka. Concentrations gradually increased from similar to 5.5 to similar to 4.2 ka, significantly increased from similar to 4.2 to similar to 2.6 ka, and then increased dramatically after similar to 2.6 ka. By combining these results with charcoal concentrations (>50 mu m), lithic artifacts, bones and potsherds recovered from the JXG2 site, we infer that early pastoralism in Qinghai Lake Basin appeared between similar to 6.0 to similar to 5.5 ka and gradually intensified throughout the remainder of the Holocene as herding and farming gradually replaced hunting-gathering as the primary subsistence strategies. These results are supported by pollen records, archeological remains and historical records in the northeastern QTP.

KeywordCoprophilous fungal spores pastoralism Qinghai Lake Basin Holocene Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau
DOI10.1177/0309133319869596
Language英语
WOS KeywordSURFACE POLLEN ASSEMBLAGES ; PERMANENT HUMAN OCCUPATION ; CLIMATE-CHANGE ; CULTURAL-EVOLUTION ; GRAZING ACTIVITIES ; GUANZHONG BASIN ; HIGH-RESOLUTION ; HIGH-ALTITUDE ; HOLOCENE ; CHARCOAL
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[41877455] ; Science and Technology Department of Qinghai Province Natural Science Fund Project[2017-ZJ-931Q] ; Science and Technology Department of Qinghai Province Natural Science Fund Project[2017-ZJ-903] ; Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS)[183123]
WOS Research AreaPhysical Geography ; Geology
WOS SubjectGeography, Physical ; Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
WOS IDWOS:000484590200001
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China ; Science and Technology Department of Qinghai Province Natural Science Fund Project ; Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS)
PublisherSAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.nigpas.ac.cn/handle/332004/27940
Collection中国科学院南京地质古生物研究所
Corresponding AuthorWei, Hai-cheng
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Qinghai Inst Salt Lakes, Key Lab Comprehens & Highly Efficient Utilizat Sa, 18 Xinning Rd, Xining 810008, Qinghai, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Qinghai Inst Salt Lake, Qinghai Prov Key Lab Geol & Environm Salt Lakes, Xining, Qinghai, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Nanjing Inst Geol & Palaeontol, State Key Lab Palaeobiol & Stratig, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples R China
4.Qinghai Normal Univ, Sch Geog Sci, Qinghai Prov Key Lab Phys Geog & Environm Proc, Xining, Qinghai, Peoples R China
5.Univ Texas Austin, Texas Archeol Res Lab, Austin, TX 78712 USA
First Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Corresponding Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Wei, Hai-cheng,Hou, Guang-liang,Fan, Qi-shun,et al. Using coprophilous fungi to reconstruct the history of pastoralism in the Qinghai Lake Basin, Northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau[J]. PROGRESS IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY-EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT,2020,44(1):70-93.
APA Wei, Hai-cheng.,Hou, Guang-liang.,Fan, Qi-shun.,Madsen, David B..,Qin, Zhan-jie.,...&Shan, Fa-shou.(2020).Using coprophilous fungi to reconstruct the history of pastoralism in the Qinghai Lake Basin, Northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.PROGRESS IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY-EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT,44(1),70-93.
MLA Wei, Hai-cheng,et al."Using coprophilous fungi to reconstruct the history of pastoralism in the Qinghai Lake Basin, Northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau".PROGRESS IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY-EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT 44.1(2020):70-93.
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