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Calcified coccoid from Cambrian Miaolingian: Revealing the potential cellular structure of Epiphyton
Zhang, Xiyang1,2,3; Dai, Mingyue1; Wang, Min1; Qi, Yong'an1
2019-03-14
Source PublicationPLOS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
Volume14Issue:3Pages:18
AbstractEpiphyton, Renalcis, and Girvanella are ubiquitous genera of calcified cyanobacteria/algae from Early Paleozoic shallow-marine limestones. One genus, Epiphyton, is characterized by a particular dendritic outline, and extensive research has revealed the morphology of calcified remains although little information on cellular structure is known. The mass occurrence of calcified Epiphyton in microbialites from Cambrian Miaolingian, the Mianchi area of North China is preserved as black clots within thrombolites and have dendritic and spherical outlines when viewed with a petrographic microscope. These remains, visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM), also comprise spherical or rectangle capsules. These capsules are made up from external envelopes and internal calcite with numerous pits, which closely resemble modern benthic coccoid cyanobacteria. These pits are between 2 mu m and 4 mu m in diameter and are interpreted here to represent the remnants of degraded coccoid cells, while the calcite that surrounds these pits is interpreted as calcified thin extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). In contrast, associated capsular envelopes represent thick EPS mineralized by calcium carbonate with an admixture of Al-Mg-Fe silicates. Dendritic ` thalli' are typically stacked apically because of the repeated growth and calcification of these capsules. Carbon and oxygen isotope results are interpreted to indicate that both photosynthesis and heterotrophic bacterial metabolism (especially sulfate reducing bacteria) contributed to carbonate precipitation by elevated alkalinity. Epiphyton are therefore here interpreted as colonies of calcified coccoid cyanobacteria, and the carbonate-oversaturated seawater during the Cambrian was conducive to their mineralization.
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0213695
Language英语
WOS KeywordCARBONATE PRECIPITATION ; CALCIUM-CARBONATE ; NORTH CHINA ; ALGAL MATS ; CYANOBACTERIA ; RENALCIS ; BIOMINERALIZATION ; STROMATOLITES ; MICROFOSSILS ; LIMESTONES
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[41872111]
WOS Research AreaScience & Technology - Other Topics
WOS SubjectMultidisciplinary Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000461166300062
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China
PublisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.nigpas.ac.cn/handle/332004/15903
Collection中国科学院南京地质古生物研究所
Corresponding AuthorQi, Yong'an
Affiliation1.Henan Polytech Univ, Sch Resources & Environm, Jiaozuo, Henan, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Nanjing Inst Geol & Palaeontol, State Key Lab Palaeobiol & Stratig, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Excellence Life & Paleoenvironm, Nanjing, Jiangsu, Peoples R China
First Author AffilicationNanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeonotology,CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Zhang, Xiyang,Dai, Mingyue,Wang, Min,et al. Calcified coccoid from Cambrian Miaolingian: Revealing the potential cellular structure of Epiphyton[J]. PLOS ONE,2019,14(3):18.
APA Zhang, Xiyang,Dai, Mingyue,Wang, Min,&Qi, Yong'an.(2019).Calcified coccoid from Cambrian Miaolingian: Revealing the potential cellular structure of Epiphyton.PLOS ONE,14(3),18.
MLA Zhang, Xiyang,et al."Calcified coccoid from Cambrian Miaolingian: Revealing the potential cellular structure of Epiphyton".PLOS ONE 14.3(2019):18.
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